The Sponge

Using the sponge analogy, a child’s mind retains knowledge the same way an unstressed sponge retains water. However, it is worth mentioning that the grade of substance which is being retained by the above mentioned bodies will ultimately dictate the form of the retainer in future times. A classic case of form follows function. A sponge which is used to deal with wasteful substances will eventually be labelled a wasteful sponge, never used when the job requires no sloppy traces of past dirt to be left behind. One will only turn to this wasteful sponge only when a dirty task has to be done, a dirty task which the sponge initially lost its potential too.

Safe to say the young mind absorbs and retains knowledge just like a brand new sponge. Feed the mind wasteful knowledge and it will grow into a wasteful mind. Feed it useful knowledge and it will become an outstanding mind. This provides, more or less, reason for why technology is being introduced to children at a pretty young age. Kids get a chance to familiarize themselves with the technology which they will be interacting with for a large part of their lives. Making sure that they absorb as much knowledge as they can from using these devices.

This leaves the argument of the usefulness of the activities that the kids get up to. Will these activities stimulate the young minds to also develop a broader cognitive view of the world then the one provided for them on a 3 to 20 inch computer screen? Which is why, digital devices need content that stimulates a young minds thought process while also introducing them to knowledge that is relevant and constructive to their culture. This will hopefully rise minds which will contribute amazingly to society when they reach their prime age(s).

Not forgotten to mention that some young minds have specific needs, ranging from different reading speeds to visual deficiencies. Any devices put in place to develop young minds should at least contain personalized features well suited for the students’ needs. Familiar animated characters have also been shown to speed up the above mentioned process.

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  • lenkosi

    Interesting discussion. Had a discussion with colleagues the other day about the large number of young kids watching game reviews on YouTube, but never playing games…different topic, but I think what you discussed has some significance to this